My Name is Barbera https://www.mynameisbarbera.com A storytelling Journey through Monferrato Wed, 12 Dec 2018 16:28:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 WELCOME https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/welcome-kerin-okeefe-barbera-asti/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/welcome-kerin-okeefe-barbera-asti/#respond Wed, 12 Dec 2018 16:12:21 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4469 Barbera d’Asti welcomes wine writers from around the world.   Last week a group of 100 or so wine writers, wine bloggers, lifestyle writers, and “opinion leaders” (as they call them in Italy) were welcomed in the land of Barbera by the Barbera d’Asti growers and bottlers consortium. It was a really impressive gathering, with people from all over the world: China, Indonesia, Korea, Russia, Poland, Lithuania, England, and America. And those are just the people I interacted and traded notes with. I don’t even know exactly how many countries were represented. Honestly, I’ve never seen anything like it. Back…

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Barbera d’Asti welcomes wine writers from around the world.

 

Last week a group of 100 or so wine writers, wine bloggers, lifestyle writers, and “opinion leaders” (as they call them in Italy) were welcomed in the land of Barbera by the Barbera d’Asti growers and bottlers consortium.

It was a really impressive gathering, with people from all over the world: China, Indonesia, Korea, Russia, Poland, Lithuania, England, and America. And those are just the people I interacted and traded notes with. I don’t even know exactly how many countries were represented. Honestly, I’ve never seen anything like it. Back in my media junket days, groups like this were usually limited to 10-12 people at the most.

One of the highlights was Kerin O’Keefe’s master class on Barbera d’Asti where the writers etc. got to taste 19 wines side-by-side. Kerin O’Keefe is one of the leading English-language Italian-focused wine writers working in the world today. And she’s also a top taster: As a senior editor for Wine Enthusiast magazine she tastes thousands of Italian wines each year. It was great to get to glean Kerin O’Keefe insights as she led the tasting and we tasted the wines together.

An American and a Truffle: Perfect matrimonyWhile the styles varied greatly, the overarching high quality of the wines was truly impressive. It seemed that all of my colleagues agreed that the wines were among the best we had ever tasted from the appellation. And of course, that was just the tip of the iceberg. Over the course of the three days that we were “on the ground” in Barbera d’Asti, we also had the opportunity to taste with scores and scores of producers.

One thing that emerged was that many Barbera growers and producers (most of them, in fact) make a “traditional-style” wine and a “modern-style” wine. I couldn’t help but note that a lot of them presented the wines as such (verbatim).

The traditional wines are generally made in stainless steel and are fresher and brighter than their modern counterparts, which are generally aged in new cask. The cask-aged wines are “bigger” and rounder, which notes of oak and tobacco The White Truffle of Alba: the scent of Piedmontcomplementing the classic zippy fruit that Barbera delivers. I tend to prefer the traditional. But like many of my colleagues, I found myself enjoying the modern-style wines. It seems that Barbera d’Asti has really found its groove in terms of its ability to produce “something for everyone.”

Especially given the size of the group, the organizers did a fantastic job of executing the event. And we were all treated to a bounty of freshly shaved truffles. On one day, we ate truffles at lunch and dinner!
Thank you, Barbera d’Asti, for hosting us. It was a really remarkable and unforgettable experience.

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GRIGNOLINO AND THE WITCH’S CAT https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/grignolino-witchs-cat/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/grignolino-witchs-cat/#respond Wed, 05 Dec 2018 08:00:52 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4452 When I was a little girl, I loved the book “Gobbolino, the Witch’s Cat” by Ursula Moray Williams. This book title has been going round and round in my head recently while I’ve been thinking about and planning this article. It is pretty obvious that Gobbolino rhymes with Grignolino of course. But is there something else?   I first had the pleasure of discovering Grignolino at Vinitaly earlier this year. The Grignolino d’Asti Association, a sub group of the Consorzio Barbera d’Asti, had been formed only a week before, with my friend Dante installed as President. I had the pleasure…

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When I was a little girl, I loved the book “Gobbolino, the Witch’s Cat” by Ursula Moray Williams. This book title has been going round and round in my head recently while I’ve been thinking about and planning this article. It is pretty obvious that Gobbolino rhymes with Grignolino of course. But is there something else?

 

I first had the pleasure of discovering Grignolino at Vinitaly earlier this year. The Grignolino d’Asti Association, a sub group of the Consorzio Barbera d’Asti, had been formed only a week before, with my friend Dante installed as President. I had the pleasure of talking to Dante all about this interesting grape variety before and during a dedicated tasting hosted by the Consorzio at the Piemonte pavilion.

Previously known as Berbexinus, the first records date from as far back as 1249 and it was a popular wine in the Royal households of the 18th and 19th centuries, before and after the Unification of Italy.

Grignolino d’Asti is a gentle, elegant wine, with a fine body, low acidity and high tannins, getting its name from “grignole” which are the seeds of a grape. Its vineyards cover a wide growing area, but the heart of Grignolino production is Portacomaro. Dante says that some people consider it a difficult grape to grow, but just ‘needs to be told what to do and can excel when managed firmly’. Long ageing in wood has been tried, but Dante states that it doesn’t have the character for ageing, and is at its best when drunk fresh and young.

This became more apparent during the tasting, hosted by Paolo Massobrio, a well-known Italian wine journalist. We tasted wines from 2015, 2016 and 2017, with the 2017 the first to be recognised as DOC. The difference in vintage was noticeable, as was the difference in terroir. All were classically low in acid and high in tannin.

We started with the youngest, and tasted four from 2017. In general, young Grignolino is a pale ruby with a tendency to garnet, with notes of strawberries and red cherries, followed by roses and violets when it opens up after some contact with the air. For me, this is a red which makes me think of summer. It would be an excellent companion to fish, a pairing I have yet to try.

The three wines from 2016 showed a rather quick evolution with more sweet spice, the flowers and fruit still present but less pronounced, and with notes of sweet black tea. The single 2015 vintage was strikingly different – very little primary notes, with tobacco, tea and spice more evident. It was quite clear that this is definitely a wine to be enjoyed soon after bottling. I loved this tasting and hope to drink more Grignolino in future, but unfortunately, I have not yet come across it in the U.K.

I will leave you with another possible reason that Gobbolino reminds me of Grignolino: Gobbolino did not particularly want to conform to the stereotype of being a witch’s cat. He had no desire to learn spells or master flying on broomsticks. He just needed to be loved by a regular person, belong to a normal home, and was quite happy to be wanted just for being a cat – simple pleasures. In a way, Grignolino is a red wine has no inclination to be aged for years, has no pretensions, but wants to be enjoyed in the here and now – simple pleasures of the vinous kind.

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BARBERA HERE WE COME! https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/barbera-we-come/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/barbera-we-come/#respond Wed, 28 Nov 2018 20:00:25 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4464 I’m thrilled to share the news that I will be traveling to Asti province this week for a series of tastings of Barbera.   I’ll be joined by a group of top English-language wine writers and wine-focused journalists and bloggers, including some that I know well and others that I’m looking forward to meeting and getting to know better. One of the things that I’m most exited about is a Master Class on Barbera d’Asti that will be led by acclaimed American wine writer and author Kerin O’Keefe, a senior editor for Wine Enthusiast magazine and one of the top…

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I’m thrilled to share the news that I will be traveling to Asti province this week for a series of tastings of Barbera.

 

I’ll be joined by a group of top English-language wine writers and wine-focused journalists and bloggers, including some that I know well and others that I’m looking forward to meeting and getting to know better.
One of the things that I’m most exited about is a Master Class on Barbera d’Asti that will be led by acclaimed American wine writer and author Kerin O’Keefe, a senior editor for Wine Enthusiast magazine and one of the top wine writers working in the field today.
Here on the blog, I’ve written repeatedly about how Barbera is one of the most misunderstood and maligned grapes in the world. The deeper I’ve dived into my research, the more I’ve discovered that Barbera enjoyed a glorious past — not just in Italy but in France and America as well.
So there literally could be no music sweeter to my ears than knowing that I will be touring Barbera’s spiritual homeland with some of the best and brightest wine communicators and storytellers in the world.
We’ll also have the opportunity to experience Barbera in its “natural habitat.” We’ll be visiting Nizza, where the newly created Nizza DOCG was recently launched. We’ll also have the opportunity to sit down and break bread with top Barbera growers and winemakers, getting to pair their wines with classic dishes — just the way they eat at home.
Starting week after next, I’ll begin posting about my experiences, impressions, and tasting notes. and I’ll also be sharing those of my colleagues here on the blog as well.
So buckle your seatbelts and get ready for some world-class blogging from the land of Barbera.

Barbera, here we come!

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ADVENTURES BEYOND BARBERA https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/adventures-beyond-barbera/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/adventures-beyond-barbera/#respond Wed, 28 Nov 2018 18:00:49 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4060 Barbera is a bridge that starts an adventure into the history, land, people, and tastes that make up such compelling and unique wines as Ruchè, Grignolino, Albarossa.   Well, this is it. It’s hard to believe that we’ve officially come to the end of such an eye-opening, palate-expanding, and, yeah, wine-soaked journey that I started many months ago. I’m forever grateful to the Consorzio Barbera d’Asti e vini del Monferrato for making it happen. And it’s ironic, but after working with a great organization that focuses on the Monferrato region’s incredible range of Barbera wines and production, and writing and…

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Barbera is a bridge that starts an adventure into the history, land, people, and tastes that make up such compelling and unique wines as Ruchè, Grignolino, Albarossa.

 

Well, this is it.

It’s hard to believe that we’ve officially come to the end of such an eye-opening, palate-expanding, and, yeah, wine-soaked journey that I started many months ago. I’m forever grateful to the Consorzio Barbera d’Asti e vini del Monferrato for making it happen.

And it’s ironic, but after working with a great organization that focuses on the Monferrato region’s incredible range of Barbera wines and production, and writing and videoing about it for a website called My Name Is Barbera, I’m going to finish my work here by imploring you to explore the red wines of the region other than Barbera!

That’s because Monferrato sits inside of Piemonte, one of the most versatile wine regions in all of Italy (and therefore, by extension, one of the most versatile wine regions in all of the world). If you want to blow your own mind sometime, go check out a map of the official DOC and DOCG wine-producing areas in Monferrato – you will see a panoply of overlapping production regions that include some of the most well-known of northern Italian wines, along with several lesser-known but impressive and up-and-coming offerings.

Barbera is the pop star of the Monferrato reds, no doubt, but for lovers of Italian wine, and of versatile, food-friendly red wines in general, Barbera can be something more: Barbera is the “gateway drug” to the rest of Piedmont. Barbera is a bridge that starts an adventure into the history, land, people, and tastes that make up such compelling and unique wines as Ruchè, Grignolino, Albarossa.

I know this, because I literally lived it (just go check through this website’s back catalog, folks!). And it was awesome.

And the quickest way that I can summarize Ruchè, Grignolino, and Albarossa for you is to tell you that if the swashbuckling Indiana Jones ever drank wine, then these are the grapes that would likely have been his favorites.

Will Ruchè, Grignolino, or Albarossa ever topple Barbera as the ambassador of Monferrato red wine to the world? Maybe, but we’re unlikely to see that in our lifetimes; their production numbers just are nowhere near as high as Barbera d’Asti. But that, to me, is actually kind of the point of those off-the-beaten-path grapes. By their very natures, they are so unique that they demand exploration, daring, and an open mind.

They are the lovable, handsome, anti-heros of Piemonte red wine. They are quirky, and scene-stealing, and make us love them despite their assertive natures. And maybe most importantly, these are wines for badass gastronomic adventurers! They are wily, surprising, and have turn-on-a-dime versatility (sounds a lot like a certain scruffy, fedora-wearing, whip-snapping film hero, doesn’t it?). Only the vinously daring need apply.

I can imagine what some of you are probably thinking, your inner voice sounding something like “but wait, don’t you want me to love Barbera?” Do I want you to love Barbera like I love it? Yes, of course I want you to love Barbera like I love it. I actually can’t think of any valid reason for you not to love Barbera.

But what I’m trying to get at here is that I don’t want you to stop your Monferrato love with Barbera. If you explore the riches of Piemonte’s many incarnations of Barbera, you’ll undoubtedly be a happy camper, sure. But you’re not finished exploring Monferrato with It. Ignore Ruchè, Grignolino, or Albarossa, and you ignore the hidden gems, the secret passageways, the cool extra finds that make the exploration all the more complete, and all the more rewarding for the effort.

What I’m getting at here is that you don’t want to pack up and walk away from the Temple of Monferrato just because you found the golden idol of Barbera. You need to keep that fedora on, and keep that whip handy at your side, and continue to explore. You need to find the rest of the treasures tucked away in there.

What I’m getting at here is that you’re a Monferrato adventurer now. So enjoy the journey, revisit the spoils, and maybe even show some other adventures the quickest way down the paths.

 

Cheers!

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PLEASE STOP CALLING BARBERA “THE WINE OF THE PEOPLE” https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/piedmont-barbera-wine-people/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/piedmont-barbera-wine-people/#respond Wed, 14 Nov 2018 20:00:32 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4438 You should consider that Barbera comes from Piedmont, one of Italy’s most liberal regions where “people” are known for their broad intellectual interests and cosmopolitan culture.   Over the course of the last couple of posts, we’ve looked at many of the myths about Barbera here and here and we’ve pointed out how many misconceptions there are about the grape variety throughout the wine writing world. But of all the misinformation that’s still out there when it comes to Barbera, the one that really rubs me the wrong way is the often repeated but totally misplaced and misinformed adage that Barbera…

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You should consider that Barbera comes from Piedmont, one of Italy’s most liberal regions where “people” are known for their broad intellectual interests and cosmopolitan culture.

 

Over the course of the last couple of posts, we’ve looked at many of the myths about Barbera here and here and we’ve pointed out how many misconceptions there are about the grape variety throughout the wine writing world.
But of all the misinformation that’s still out there when it comes to Barbera, the one that really rubs me the wrong way is the often repeated but totally misplaced and misinformed adage that Barbera is the wine of the people.

Just Google it and you will see what I mean. Here are my thoughts on the matter.

1. As we have seen repeated in my research, Barbera was actually once (and still is) considered an “elite” wine, a “top” wine. Remember Giovanni Pascoli’s poem “A Ciapin”. Nebbiolo is currently Piedmont’s most lucrative grape. But it wasn’t always like that, as we have seen repeatedly. And even today, especially when it comes to Barbera d’Asti, there are scores of wines that land at high “premium” and “luxury” prices.
2. Who exactly are the “people”? Oh, man, this gets under my skin! When you say that Barbera is the wine of the people you’re basically saying that Barbera is the wine for people who can’t afford the best wine, it’s wine for people who don’t know what good wine is. You know: The “people” in quotes, citizens who don’t follow the snobby rules of the “elite,” the privileged who drink “good” wines. No, that’s not going to fly with me, especially when you consider that Barbera comes from Piedmont, one of Italy’s most liberal regions where “people” are known for their broad intellectual interests and cosmopolitan culture.

By saying that Barbera is the wine of the people, you unwittingly (or perhaps intentionally) divide wine lovers into two classes — one superior, one inferior.  And anyone who’s likes Barbera as much as I do is my kinda people!

If it weren’t for Prohibition and the disruption of the commercial wine trade in California, we’d probably be drinking Barbera today instead of “Napa Valley Cab”

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BEWARE BARBERA MISINFORMATION https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/beware-barbera-misinformation/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/beware-barbera-misinformation/#respond Wed, 07 Nov 2018 20:00:47 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4430 It was a disappointment to discover that apart from the My Name Is Barbera project, the English language internets are a barren landscape when it comes to solid information about Barbera.   In our last post  we debunked 5 common myths about Barbera. As a follow up to that piece, I thought I would create a post with links to English-language resources about Barbera. And so I set about Google-searching things like “Barbera wine” and “Barbera d’Asti.” It was a disappointment to discover that apart from the My Name Is Barbera project, the English language internets are a barren landscape…

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It was a disappointment to discover that apart from the My Name Is Barbera project, the English language internets are a barren landscape when it comes to solid information about Barbera.

 

In our last post  we debunked 5 common myths about Barbera. As a follow up to that piece, I thought I would create a post with links to English-language resources about Barbera. And so I set about Google-searching things like “Barbera wine” and “Barbera d’Asti.” It was a disappointment to discover that apart from the My Name Is Barbera project, the English language internets are a barren landscape when it comes to solid information about Barbera. And what’s more, they are rife with misinformation about Barbera. I’m really sorry to report that but it’s true.

The Wikipedia entry for Barbera, although very well written, is an example of this. It actually has some good, hard information in it. But it also is the source of a falsehood about Barbera that has been widely and sadly propagated across the world wide webs.

When you Google Barbera, among the sites that come up at the top of the search engine results, nearly all of them report that Barbera is 1,000 years older than Cabernet Sauvignon. It’s weird because nearly all the writers seem to believe that this info somehow makes Barbera cool.

I believe the Wikipedia page is where this “myth” was started. The entry says that “Barbera is believed to have originated in the hills of Monferrato in central Piemonte, Italy where it has been known from the thirteenth century.”

It’s true that Barbera is believed to have originated in Monferrato (see my post on Barbera’s Spiritual Homeland). But it’s unlikely that the grapes they grew back in the Middle Ages had a genetic resemblance to the wine we know today. In fact, the earliest mentions of Barbera (as we know it today) come from the 18th century.

Yet, across the internets, uninformed writers tout it as “older than Cabernet Sauvignon!” (even though I fail to see why that’s significant).

Unfortunately, the two best anglophone resources about Barbera that you can find online are both behind paywalls.

The very best is the Google Play version of Ian D’Agata’s Native Grapes of Italy (a reference work that I consult regularly and that I highly recommend to you). Also excellent is the Barbera entry on JancisRobinson.com. You can’t see that page without being a subscriber, although you can see this free page in the “learn grape varieties” section of the wonderful site.

Unfortunately, the Jancis Robinson page is the unwitting source of one of the biggest misconceptions about Barbera. We’ll take that one on in our next post. Stay tuned and buckle your seats!

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AUTUMN IN MONFERRATO https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/autumn-in-monferrato/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/autumn-in-monferrato/#respond Thu, 01 Nov 2018 14:00:20 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4426 Our beautiful autumn landscapes are waiting for you

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Our beautiful autumn landscapes are waiting for you

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5 DEBUNKED MYTHS ABOUT BARBERA https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/5-debunked-myths-about-barbera/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/5-debunked-myths-about-barbera/#respond Wed, 24 Oct 2018 13:00:07 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4415 Perceptions aside, Barbera has every right to its place among the world’s greatest fine wine grapes   Barbera can’t age In fact, as we discussed in a recent post, Barbera has remarkable aging potential thanks to its vibrant acidity. A lot of people believe that only highly tannic grapes can age. But the truth is that you need that acidity to make a wine age-worthy. I’ve drunk Barbera that had been aged for 20+ years and it was fantastic. Not a curiosity but great, nuanced, delicious wine. Barbera is only drunk during summer In fact, Barbera is one of Italy’s…

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Perceptions aside, Barbera has every right to its place among the world’s greatest fine wine grapes

 

  1. Barbera can’t age

In fact, as we discussed in a recent post, Barbera has remarkable aging potential thanks to its vibrant acidity. A lot of people believe that only highly tannic grapes can age. But the truth is that you need that acidity to make a wine age-worthy. I’ve drunk Barbera that had been aged for 20+ years and it was fantastic. Not a curiosity but great, nuanced, delicious wine.

  1. Barbera is only drunk during summer

In fact, Barbera is one of Italy’s most popular wines and is served throughout the year. It’s true that Barbera, thanks to its bright fruit and acidity, is great chilled and it makes for a great pairing with summer time foods. But Italians drink it year round, including the winter months when its lithe character makes it a great match for roasts and the heavier food served during the holiday season.

  1. Barbera is only aged in stainless steel

In fact, cask aging is one of the hallmarks of wines produced by Italy’s top Barbera growers. It was back in the 1980s that Asti winemaker began experimenting with large cask and small cask aging of Barbera. And the results were spectacular. Today, many Barbera d’Asti producer make a youthful, fresher style of Barbera and a cask-aged richer style Barbera that can age with great success.

  1. Barbera is only made a light, easy-drinking wine.

In fact, as we have seen above, Barbera is so versatile that it can made in both a light and highly approachable style and a richer more opulent style. Before the modernization of the Italian wine industry in the 1980s, Barbera was generally made as a lighter style wine to be enjoyed in its youth. But a handful of forward-thinking winemakers in the 80s introduced the world to cask-aged Barbera that makes for complex and highly nuanced wine.

  1. Barbera is a child of a lesser god

In fact, as we saw in a post from earlier this year, there was a time when Barbera was the King of Piedmont viticulture. Today, when most people think of top wines from the region, they don’t always include Barbera in that class. But Barbera is also a grape that changed the world: Perceptions aside, Barbera has every right to its place among the world’s greatest fine wine grapes.

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CAN BARBERA D’ASTI AGE? https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/barbera-aging/ https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/barbera-aging/#respond Wed, 10 Oct 2018 13:02:52 +0000 https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/?p=4401 But there’s another factor that goes into the longevity and age-ability of red wines: Acidity! And acidity is something that Barbera has a lot of.   A recent wine tasting and seminar in Houston had a group of seasoned tasters literally swooning in their seats. They couldn’t believe it, they said, that they were tasting expressions of Barbera d’Asti that stretched back to the late 1990s. Most wine-savvy Americans think of Barbera as a wine to be drunk young. They love the freshness, bright fruit flavors, and  its light body. And they often sing the praises of its food-friendliness. But…

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But there’s another factor that goes into the longevity and age-ability of red wines: Acidity! And acidity is something that Barbera has a lot of.

 

A recent wine tasting and seminar in Houston had a group of seasoned tasters literally swooning in their seats. They couldn’t believe it, they said, that they were tasting expressions of Barbera d’Asti that stretched back to the late 1990s.

Most wine-savvy Americans think of Barbera as a wine to be drunk young. They love the freshness, bright fruit flavors, and  its light body. And they often sing the praises of its food-friendliness. But when you ask most American wine lovers, even those with a lot of wine eduction under their belts, if they’ve ever had an aged Barbera, the answer will most likely be no. And if you ask them if they think that Barbera can age, likewise the answer will probably be no.

In most cases, it’s because they have never had an aged Barbera. But a lot of people, especially those that have spent some time studying viticulture, will say that it can’t age because it lacks tannin and “tannic structure.”

It’s true that robust tannins help red wines to age. They act as a sort of anti-oxidant that stops the wine from oxidizing as quickly as it would otherwise. That’s why old red wines can still have rich fruit flavors even when aged over the course of decades.

But there’s another factor that goes into the longevity and age-ability of red wines: Acidity! And acidity is something that Barbera has a lot of.

I first discovered the joy of aged Barbera back when I was working in a wine shop in New York. Wines with ten and even twenty years of bottle age, I found, showed brilliantly, with great freshness and primary, secondary, and tertiary flavors. These were not tired old bottles to be drunk for curiosity’s sake. These were regal bottles to be enjoyed with aged cheeses.

It was no surprise to me that people enjoyed 20-year-old Barbera the other night in Houston. But it made me think about how, again and again, this true “king” of wines is often misunderstood because of how it is perceived.

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A Guide to the Glass: Barbera d’Asti https://www.mynameisbarbera.com/glass-barbera-dasti/ Wed, 03 Oct 2018 12:20:53 +0000 http://mynameisbarbera.com/?p=1371 Yes, the glass amplifies the organoleptic qualities of wine. Because different areas of the tongue and mouth, along the irreplaceable nose job, are responsible for us appropriately perceive the taste sensations to make the best wine.   Wine and Stemware. Which glasses choose? Objects of design. Beautiful, elegant, slender. Glasses with room for your nose, organic forms to release and give off the fragrance, ergonomic grooves for the thumb. The wine container has already enjoyed what it contains. How many different types of glasses are used? And what is the best glass to taste the Barbera d’Asti? Here are some tips to better enjoy the fragrance…

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Yes, the glass amplifies the organoleptic qualities of wine. Because different areas of the tongue and mouth, along the irreplaceable nose job, are responsible for us appropriately perceive the taste sensations to make the best wine.

 

Wine and Stemware. Which glasses choose?
Objects of design. Beautiful, elegant, slender. Glasses with room for your nose, organic forms to release and give off the fragrance, ergonomic grooves for the thumb. The wine container has already enjoyed what it contains. How many different types of glasses are used? And what is the best glass to taste the Barbera d’Asti? Here are some tips to better enjoy the fragrance and flavor of your favorite wines.

The right glasses for each wine
Is there really the right glass for the right wine?
Yes, the glass amplifies the organoleptic qualities of wine. Because different areas of the tongue and mouth, along the irreplaceable nose job, are responsible for us appropriately perceive the taste sensations to make the best wine.

Some Examples
To taste the bubbles of champagne the the flûte is better than the champagne coupe because with the flûte the freshness of the tiny bubbles goes and hits the central part of the tongue, the area with a greater palpable sensitivity and then it goes back of the tongue, where there we sense bitterness. That’s why we say bitter aftertaste. Partly because the bitter taste comes towards the end. But also because the area for bitter is in the back of the tongue. With a coupe the wine opens on the sides of the tongue, responsible for acid and salt, and the sensation is not enjoyable.To enjoy an aged red wine it’s better to use a large and open glass because the wine needs to be oxygenated in order to release its fragrance.
A rosé wine really needs the tulip glass because its aroma is delicate and must be guided towards the nose.

And Barbera d’Asti?
A wine so pleasant, fresh and versatile lends itself to the use of red wine glasses, round with a long stem. The younger Barbera d’Asti’s are more suitable for a glass with the edges which open slightly allowing you to really taste the fruit notes on the tip of your tongue. For a Barbera d’Asti Superiore or a Nizza, which are more complex wines, wine glasses that start wider and then taper in towards the top and the edges are more suitable. This is so the bouquet is properly released balancing the concentration. As the wine flows toward the center of the mouth, taking it over and releasing all of its flavor and intensity.

 

 

The post A Guide to the Glass: Barbera d’Asti appeared first on My Name is Barbera.

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